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Aviation

CEO Dennis Muilenburg Stripped Off Boeing’s Chairman Title as Company Separates Roles

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Boeing’s Board has removed CEO Dennis Muilenburg’s title as chairman in an unexpected strategy shift as announced by the U.S. plane maker on Friday.

The latest step which the board has taken in recent weeks to improve executive oversight of its engineering ranks and industrial operations was separating the roles which would pave way for Muilenburg to have ‘maximum focus’ on steering Boeing’s daily operations.

In an announcement on Friday afternoon, Boeing said that lead Director David Calhoun, a senior managing director at Blackstone Group, will take over as non-executive chairman. The announcement expressed the Board’s confidence in Muilenburg, who would remain on the board and retain the top job.

“The board has full confidence in Dennis as CEO and believes this division of labor will enable maximum focus on running the business with the board playing an active oversight role,” Calhoun said in the statement.

This decision was brought forth as company has been striving to put its best selling 737 MAX back in service after the safety ban which had been issued worldwide in March after two crashes which left 346 people dead in Indonesia and Ethiopia. The decision has also been partly brought forth after Muilenburg survived a split in his roles as CEO and chairman, a motion which had been put forth by shareholders six months ago. This is part of the very intense pressure he has felt in the four years which he has been working at the helm of the world’s largest plane maker.

Boeing and U.S. regulators were criticized over certification of the plane earlier on Friday by an international aviation panel. It was revealed by an internal review that the company was looking to re-organize its engineering reporting lines company-wide and ensure higher ranking officials and also achieves the increase at which the reception of feedback concerning safety issues from the lower levels of the company. Weekly reports of potential safety issues discussed in meetings of rank and file engineers were taken to Muilenburg as part of the move too.

Muilenburg is required to testify before U.S. House panel on 30th October and questions have been raised by lawmakers about 737 MAX certification. More than 100 lawsuits are also being held against the company concerning the crashes alleging flaws in the design.

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Aviation

Business Aviation Risks Ban in UK by 2025, Labor Politicians have Suggested

Dennis Kamau

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The business aviation in United Kingdom is at a threat of being banned by 2025, some UK politicians have suggested.

NBAA CEO Ed Bolen says “The Business Aviation has seen the pioneering of new technologies that has seen reduction of carbon emission with less than 40% emission.” However, this isn’t the case with UK Labor politicians. Some are pushing for ultimate ban of business aviation. This has seen the business aviation groups coming into the defense with National Business Aviation Association and International Business being the main fighting for their industry.

The main reason for pushing the ban is that business aviation is too dirty. Why do they view it as being dirty? Well, The Labor politicians view the business aviation as a leading carbon emission. IBAC director Kurt Edwards says “UK leaders need to focus in making sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) widely available in UK with positive incentives to encourage use of SAF in greater quantities. The business Aviation has overseen the emissions and energy saving technologies that is been used greatly in Aviation Industry.”

Also this suggestion came as a result of a report that showed the carbon emission was equivalent to 450,000 cars a year. The Shadow Transport Secretary Andy McDonald tweeted Monday 4th November, “The Multi-millionaires and billionaires who travel by jet are doing profound damages to the climate, and it’s the rest of us who’ll suffer the consequences. A phase-out date for the use of fossil fuel private jets is a sensible proposal.”

If the suggestion from the labor politicians is to go by, then the business aviation will suffer great losses and eventually death due to lack of profits. This is also going to greatly affect the creativity of newer technologies that will cut the energy and carbon emissions which is influenced by some of the invention technologies from business aviation as stated by IBAC director. It will also influence the full achievement of environment friendly after fossil planes are phased out as, UK seeks to be environment friendly by 2044 using strategies and plans outlined in the 25-year plan launched in 2018.

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Africa

Air Zimbabwe Jetliner Resumes Normal Flight Schedules after being Granded in South Africa

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Air Zimbabwe Plane at the Joshua Mqabuko International Airport (Credit: ZimLive)

The only operational aircraft (Boeing 767-200) of Zimbabwean national carrier, Air Zimbabwe, resumed its normal flight schedules on Friday evening starting with Flight UM462 UNB/HRE from J’Burg to Harare.

“Air Zimbabwe is pleased to inform its valued clients and other stakeholders of the resumption of its normal flight schedule for both domestic and regional routes effective 25 October 2019, starting with flight UM462 UNB/HRE.” read the statement.

The airline’s management apologized to its customers for inconveniences caused after it was grounded earlier on Wednesday by South Africa’s state-run airports management company, Airports Company South Africa (ACSA).

“The National Airline wishes to sincerely apologise to all its valued passengers for all inconveniences caused. Air Zimbabwe wishes to thank and appreciate all its valued passengers for their patience, understanding and continued patronage of the National Airline.” read the statement.

Air Zimbabwe had been suspended from using South Africa’s airports over unpaid landing and parking fees. In total, the airline owes foreign and domestic creditors more than $300 million.

“Air Zimbabwe has not adhered to the cash basis terms for using airports owned by Airports Company South Africa,” ACSA said in a statement. “the prohibition will remain in place until outstanding amounts are settled.” ACSA added.

However, while announcing the resumption of the flight, Air Zimbabwe did not disclose whether the dues were paid or the settlement terms it made with ACSA.

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Aviation

38 Cracks Reported in Global Inspection of Boeing 737 Ng Jets

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Boeing Co said on Thursday that it had inspected 810 jets out of which 38 reported structural cracks requiring repairs and replacement of the parts affected.

The inspection discovered that nearly 5% of the damages are cracks in a part which attaches the plane’s fuselage or body, to the wing structure and manages forces. This device is otherwise referred to as pickle fork.

“Boeing is actively working with customers that have airplanes in their fleets with inspection findings to develop a repair plan, and to provide parts and technical support as necessary,” Boeing said in a statement. “We are working around the clock to provide the support needed to return all airplanes to service as soon as possible.”

The NG plane is a version of the popular 737 that has been produced since the 1990s – third generation 737 and version before the currently grounded 737 MAX, which is in no way impacted by the cracking issue.

While both the company and FAA declined to provide details of the airlines that have been affected, Southwest Airlines Co and the Brazil’s Gol Linhas Aereas has already grounded at the very least 13 737NG planes by Wednesday after urgent inspections were ordered by the U.S regulators.

Last week, the U.S Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) instructed the U.S aircraft operators to carry out inspection of 165 older versions of the 737NG for structural related cracks.

Earlier this week, the American and United Airlines said that they had not spotted any cracks on their aircraft. The FAA had reported that the main aim for the inspection of the aircraft was to look for cracks on the left and right hand side of the outboard chords or frame fittings on fail-safe straps. It was further explained the severity which these cracks would cause by explaining that these cracks could result in the loss of craft control.

Under the FAA directive, Aircrafts which had to be inspected within 7 days are those that have completed more than 30,000 flight cycles whilst those which have between 22,600 and 29,999 cycles are required to be inspected within 1000 cycles. To sum it all up, 1,911 U.S. 737NGs will be covered.

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