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CBK Governor Patrick Njoroge takes home the Global Markets Award.

Inversk Review

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The Central Bank of Kenya governor, Patrick Njoroge, has been called out as the best best governor in Sub Saharan Africa during the 2019 Global Markets Award which was held on the sidelines of World Bank/IMF meetings in Washington DC.

In the annual event, the CBK Boss was awarded for the success of demonetization of the old Ksh 1000 notes without injuring the country’s economy. The process of eradicating the old 1000 notes began in June and ended on the 1st of October 2019. Patrick said that the phase out was in a bid to tame illicit financial flow, terrorism financing and money laundering.

The Global Markets award comes three months after His Excellency Uhuru Kenyatta prolonged Njoroge’s term as the CBK Governor for four more years.

In his acceptance speech, Patrick Njoroge dedicated the award to the Youth of Africa whom he said need more growth openings.

“I would, therefore, want to dedicate this award to the youth of Africa who obviously need a lot more opportunities and which our actions collectively will provide for their benefits,” said Njoroge.

In 2016, the Kenya’s governor won the award for the first time for controlling inflation and straightening out Kenya’s banking sector.

Nigeria’s CBK Governor, Godwin Emefiele took the award in 2018 for coming up with long term solutions to curb inflation, promoting economic stability, boosting investor confidence and promoting inward capital inflows.

The Global Markets award ceremony began by giving applicants a forum to present their company’s achievements in the past one year.

“Some 120 pitches were heard in total and all contained stories of excellence. An editorial panel then decided the winners of the awards.  As ever, we were looking for the stories of innovation, going the extra mile for clients and industry advocacy that have powered the improvement of the global derivatives markets,” states part of the statement by Global Markets.

Since his appointment in June 19 2015, Njoroge has managed to ensure that the shilling has remained steady averaging Sh.101.97 to the US dollar during his time in office while inflation has been confined to rates recommended by the government and international institution. He has also managed to allocate the first green bond which raised Sh4.3 billion to build environmentally-friendly student accommodation.

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Kenya Today

Fuel Price Soar in the Latest EPRA Review

Kevins Jerameel

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Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority (EPRA) has hiked the fuel prices for one month of November through December. In a statement signed by EPRA Director General Pavel Oimoke on Thursday, a litre of petrol in Nairobi will now cost Sh 110.59 an increase if SG 2.54 while a litre of diesel has risen by Sh 2.65 to retail at Sh 104.61.

Households using kerosene are the hardest hit, in the latest review, kerosene consumers part with Sh 2.98 more for a liter that will cost Sh 104.06.

Kenya’s inflation increased to 5.7% in the month of September from 4.04% the previous month due to increased taxes on petroleum products.

The rate is the highest in 12 months, an indication that the impact of VAT on fuel is sieving into the economy. The price increase which took effect from Thursday night will remain in force till the midnight of December 14.

The rise in fuel proves is attributed to an increase in the landing cost for super petrol by 0.86% from Sh 4,593 per cubic meter last September to Sh 4632 per cubic meter last month while that of diesel increased by 2.08% from Sh 4919 per cubic meter to Sh 4999 cubic meter.

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Markets

Auctions Jump as Mortgage Defaults Hits sh38 Billion

Georgina Korir

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Default on mortgages jumped 41 percent to Sh38 billion, pointing to widespread distress in the real estate as it is experiencing a slump growth and property auctions pick up.

Latest real estate data from the Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) shows that mortgages shows the industry experienced the biggest hike in non-performing loans (NPLs). Unpaid mortgages increased by Ksh11.2 billion or 41.1 percent, manufacturing by 19 percent, traders by four per cent and personal loans by six percent.

According to the report, 16.9 percent of the Ksh224.8 billion gross loans extended as mortgages were not being serviced at the end of December 2018, up from 12.2 percent in 2017.

“The ratios were above the industry gross NPLs to gross loans ratio of 12.7 percent in December 2018. Deterioration in asset quality was mainly attributed to among other factors; subdued business activities, delayed payments from public and private entities and low uptake of housing and commercial units,” CBK noted.

The real estate industry was dotted with auctions, as the most people who had taken loans on the strength of their pay slips to buy property failed to service them in 2018 and 2019, following the NPLs.

Attributing to a dying economy, which has seen several companies shut, there have been a lot of job cuts in Kenya.

At least 78,400 new formal jobs were created in the economy in 2018 compared to 114,400 in 2017 this, According to the Economic Survey 2019.

Following the interest rate cap which was repealed last week, the banks have also been reluctant to offer loans to individuals and SMEs who are first time borrowers.

As a result, compared with a growth of 23.9 percent in 2015, there was minimal growth in mortgage growth of 0.7 percent last year.

CBK said, “This could be attributed to banks’ review of mortgage terms to offer mortgage loans on increasing credit risk in the real estate sector,”

It is reported that more auctions linked to mortgage defaults were conducted in 2018 compared to 2017.

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Features

Understanding Art Piece Collection Value In The Market

Dennis Kamau

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You probably have had a trigger of suspense when art is mentioned either in the movies and you wonder how to value them? Well there are a number of factors to consider when valuing an art piece.

Unknown to individuals when it comes to art, is the value that art piece carries on matters concerning the monetary value. The most important factor when valuing an art piece is the artist of the work.

A piece of work that has been produced frequently by an artist will have a high monetary value than an art piece done by a new artist. Also, works that was produced as old art collections have a quite good impression as they tell a story of occurrence of that season and whether it represents their work.

Subject of work may narrow or broaden the market of buyers as more private buyers are purchasing art directly from the artist (primary market). Certain subjects always attract more clientele than others. Like an art piece of a beautiful lady will sell better or the big five animals than a portrait of an old man.

Subjectivity of work is not a factor that is independent but depends on the drive of demand of buyers. If the demand is high the prices increases. The commercial value of art piece depends on collective intentionality similar to currency.

On a different scale, sizes matter where even though the artist may feel that a small size is efficient the buyer perception is different.  Art piece with big size are expensive in the market like a wonderful sculpt that can sit at the backyard of an individual or next to the welcoming door of the house.

The type of materials used in an art piece can greatly increase the price, Leonard Davinci Mona Lisa painting holds the highest value insurance for a paint, its custodian is the museum. Art is being redefined from the beginnings of illusionist painting to complex photography with binary digits and also, sculpture designs. We humans tend to try and tell a story of what the impression an artist had when coming up with an art design.

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